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Books

Disclaimer: If you are interested in learning more about investing and retirement planning, I would recommend the following books. Each book is linked to Amazon – these are NOT affiliate links. I am not associated with these books in any capacity and do not make any money from the sale of these books – the links are for your convenience only, should you want to purchase them. I hope you find them as interesting as I have.

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ThinkActBookThink, Act, and Invest Like Warren Buffett by Larry Swedroe

in Think, Act, and Invest Like Warren Buffett, Swedroe provides the foundational knowledge you need to:Develop a financial plan to help you make rational decisions on a consistent basis, Determine the level of risk that’s right for you, and allocate your assets accordingly, Build a low-cost, tax-efficient, globally diversified portfolio,Manage your portfolio by rebalancing periodically to maintain proper risk levels.

 

intelligent investor 50x77The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham

The greatest investment advisor of the twentieth century, Benjamin Graham taught and inspired people worldwide. Graham’s philosophy of “value investing” — which shields investors from substantial error and teaches them to develop long-term strategies — has made The Intelligent Investor the stock market bible ever since its original publication in 1949.

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The Four Pillars of InvestingThe Four Pillars of Investing by William Bernstein

The classic guide to constructing a solid portfolio—with out a financial advisor!  “With relatively little effort, you can design and assemble an investment portfolio that, because of its wide diversification and minimal expenses, will prove superior to the most professionally managed accounts.Great intelligence and good luck are not required.“ William Bernstein‘s commonsense approach to portfolio construction has served investors well during the past turbulent decade—and it‘s what made  The Four Pillars of Investing an instant classic when it was first published nearly a decade ago. This down-to-earth book lays out in easy-to-understand prose the four essential topics that every investor must master: the relationship of risk and reward, the history of the market, the psychology of the investor and the market, and the folly of taking financial advice from investment salespeople. Bernstein pulls back the curtain to reveal what really goes on in today‘s financial industry as he outlines a simple program for building wealth while controlling risk.Straightforward in its presentation and generous in its real-life examples,  The Four Pillars of Investing presents a no-nonsense discussion of:  The art and science of mixing different asset classes into an effective blend The dangers of actively picking stocks, as opposed to investing in the whole market Behavioral finance and how state of mind can adversely affect decision making Reasons the mutual fund and brokerage industries, rather than your partners, are often your most direct competitors Strategies for managing all of your assets—savings, 401(k)s, home equity—as one portfolio Investing is not a destination.

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A Random Walk Down Wall StreetA Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel

Especially in the wake of the financial meltdown, readers will hunger for Burton G. Malkiel’s reassuring, authoritative, gimmick-free, and perennially best-selling guide to investing. With 1.5 million copies sold, A Random Walk Down Wall Street has long been established as the first book to purchase when starting a portfolio. In addition to covering the full range of investment opportunities, the book features new material on the Great Recession and the global credit crisis as well as an increased focus on the long-term potential of emerging markets. With a new supplement that tackles the increasingly complex world of derivatives, along with the book’s classic life-cycle guide to investing, A Random Walk Down Wall Street remains the best investment guide money can buy.

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Analysis of Finanical StatementsAnalysis of Financial Statements by Leopold A. Bernstein and John J. Wild

A practical, up-to-date method for making the data in financial statements clear and meaningful. You get analytical tools that range from computation of ratio and cash flow measures to earnings prediction and valuation as you learn how to reconstruct the economic reality embedded in financial statements. User-friendly and engaging, this hands-on classic is loaded with graphs, charts, and tables, so you can see how topics relate to the business practices of actual companies. A concluding comprehensive case analysis of the Campbell Soup Company gives shape and color to the author’s step-by-step lessons.

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What Wall Street Doesn't Want You to KnowWhat Wall Street Doesn’t Want You to Know: How You Can Build Real Wealth Investing in Index Funds by Larry Swedroe

Why do so many actively managed funds underperform? Why do passively managed funds provide superior returns, especially after taxes? What are the true interests of fund managers and the financial press? Most important, what strategy is in your best interest?

What Wall Street Doesn’t Want You to Know answers all these questions and more, giving you the inside information you need to become a successful investor who plays the winner’s game-creating wealth-instead of the loser’s game Wall Street wants you to play, of trying to pick stocks and time the market. In his revolutionary new guide, investment professional Larry Swedroe explains why active managers have rarely been able to add value to your portfolio over time. He dispenses with traditional Wall Street wisdom and experts and shows you how to invest the way really smart money invests today.

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Quest for AlphaThe Quest for Alpha: The Holy Grail of Investing by Larry Swedroe

The debate on active investing-stock picking and market timing-versus passive investing-markets are highly efficient and almost impossible to outperform-has raged for decades. Which side is right? In The Quest for Alpha: The Holy Grail of Investing, author Larry E. Swedroe puts an end to the debate, proving once and for all that active investing is likely to prove futile as the associated expenses-costs, fees, and time spent analyzing individual stocks and the overall market-are likely to exceed any benefits gained. The book

  • Presents research, data, and quotations that reveal it’s extremely difficult to outperform the market
  • Explains why investors should focus on asset allocation, fund construction, costs, tax efficiency, and the building of a globally diversified portfolio that minimizes, if not eliminates, the taking of idiosyncratic, uncompensated risks

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The Only Guide You'll eve needThe Only Guide You’ll Ever Need for the Right Financial Plan by Larry Swedroe Kevin Grogan and Tiya Lim

A step-by-step handbook that shows you how to develop a winning personal investment strategy and reveals what it takes to make that strategy part of your overall financial plan. The Only Guide You’ll Ever Need for the Right Financial Plan focuses on the “art” of investing and gives you the information you need to create a strategy that is tailor-made for your particular situation.

Designed for savvy investors and professional advisors, this book offers the vital information needed for developing and implementing an overall strategic financial plan. In this essential resource, Swedroe outlines the basics in asset allocation and other investment planning concepts.

  • Addresses how you can design an investment policy statement and an individual asset allocation plan
  • Examines how to maintain your portfolio’s risk profile in the most cost-effective and tax-efficient manner
  • Offers insights on integrating risk management and estate planning issues into your plan

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Investment Mistakes Even Smart Investors MakeInvestment Mistakes Even Smart Investors Make and How to Avoid Them by Larry Swedroe

“Sure, we’ve all made mistakes, and they can be pretty expensive, even the first time. This wonderful volume will pay for itself a thousand times over.”

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The Behavior GapThe Behavior Gap by Carl Richards

Why do we lose money? It’s easy to blame the economy or the financial markets-but the real trouble lies in the decisions we make.

As a financial planner, Carl Richards grew frustrated watching people he cared about make the same mistakes over and over. They were letting emotion get in the way of smart financial decisions. He named this phenomenon-the distance between what we should do and what we actually do-“the behavior gap.” Using simple drawings to explain the gap, he found that once people understood it, they started doing much better.

Richards’s way with words and images has attracted a loyal following to his blog posts for The New York Times, appearances on National Public Radio, and his columns and lectures. His book will teach you how to rethink all kinds of situations where your perfectly natural instincts (for safety or success) can cost you money and peace of mind.

He’ll help you to:

  • avoid the tendency to buy high and sell low;
  • avoid the pitfalls of generic financial advice;
  • invest all of your assets-time and energy as well as savings-more wisely;
  • quit spending money and time on things that don’t matter;
  • identify your real financial goals;
  • start meaningful conversations about money;
  • simplify your financial life;
  • stop losing money!

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How the Smart Money InvestsHow The Really Smart Money Invests by Donn Burrows

Only in the last 10 to 20 years have we really understood where returns from stocks and investments come from, largely through the research of Eugene Fama and Kenneth French. These two respected economists are in the forefront of a popular movement that takes the worry out of picking stocks. Dr. Fama developed the “efficient market theory”, a simple concept that says prices reflect all available information. Accordingly, it is virtually impossible to beat the market. Your’re always paying a fair price, whether you pay $1 or $100 per share. That’s the basic concept-the price always corresponds correctly to the worth of the stock. The market is a marvelously complex tool that takes information from all over the world and implements it into a pricing system. Everyone that draws breath in one way, shape or form affects the market. The market processes the implications of the information, insight and actions of all six billion people in the world. For this reason the internal functioning of markets are virtually incomprehensible. No once can consistently accurately, pick stocks, forecast or predict what will happen on the economic horizon. Study after study has concluded there is zero correlation between the ability to pick the best stocks in one period and repeat such success in the next.

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Smartest Investment BookThe Smartest Investment Book You’ll Ever Read by Dan Solin

Daniel Solin cuts through the financial hype to show you exactly how to invest-with an easy-to-follow four-step plan that lets you create and monitor your investment portfolio in ninety minutes or less…and put your investment earnings in the top 5 percent of all professionally managed money.

If you want to gamble, go to Las Vegas-or try stock picking and market timing. If you want to be a Smart Investor, follow this effortless and effective plan.

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Your Money and Your BrainYour Money And Your Brain: Become A Smarter, More Successful Investor The Neuroscience Way by Jason Zweig

What happens inside our brains when we think about money? Quite a lot, actually, and some of it isn’t good for our financial health. In Your Money and Your Brain, Jason Zweig explains why smart people make stupid financial decisions — and what they can do to avoid these mistakes. Zweig, a veteran financial journalist, draws on the latest research in neuroeconomics, a fascinating new discipline that combines psychology, neuroscience, and economics to better understand financial decision making. He shows why we often misunderstand risk and why we tend to be overconfident about our investment decisions. Your Money and Your Brain offers some radical new insights into investing and shows investors how to take control of the battlefield between reason and emotion.

Your Money and Your Brain is as entertaining as it is enlightening. In the course of his research, Zweig visited leading neuroscience laboratories and subjected himself to numerous experiments. He blends anecdotes from these experiences with stories about investing mistakes, including confessions of stupidity from some highly successful people. Then he draws lessons and offers original practical steps that investors can take to make wiser decisions.

Anyone who has ever looked back on a financial decision and said, “How could I have been so stupid?” will benefit from reading this book.

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The Little Book of Common Sense InvestingThe Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John C. Bogle

Investing is all about common sense. Owning a diversified portfolio of stocks and holding it for the long term is a winner’s game. Trying to beat the stock market is theoretically a zero-sum game (for every winner, there must be a loser), but after the substantial costs of investing are deducted, it becomes a loser’s game. Common sense tells us—and history confirms—that the simplest and most efficient investment strategy is to buy and hold all of the nation’s publicly held businesses at very low cost. The classic index fund that owns this market portfolio is the only investment that guarantees you with your fair share of stock market returns.

To learn how to make index investing work for you, there’s no better mentor than legendary mutual fund industry veteran John C. Bogle. Over the course of his long career, Bogle—founder of the Vanguard Group and creator of the world’s first index mutual fund—has relied primarily on index investing to help Vanguard’s clients build substantial wealth. Now, with The Little Book of Common Sense Investing, he wants to help you do the same.

Filled with in-depth insights and practical advice, The Little Book of Common Sense Investing will show you how to incorporate this proven investment strategy into your portfolio. It will also change the very way you think about investing. Successful investing is not easy. (It requires discipline and patience.) But it is simple. For it’s all about common sense.

With The Little Book of Common Sense Investing as your guide, you’ll discover how to make investing a winner’s game:

  • Why business reality—dividend yields and earnings growth—is more important than market expectations
  • How to overcome the powerful impact of investment costs, taxes, and inflation
  • How the magic of compounding returns is overwhelmed by the tyranny of compounding costs
  • What expert investors and brilliant academics—from Warren Buffett and Benjamin Graham to Paul Samuelson and Burton Malkiel—have to say about index investing
  • And much more

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The New RetirementalityThe New Retirementality by Mitch Anthony

With this latest edition of The New Retirementality, readers will quickly discover how to achieve the freedom to pursue their retirement goals?at their own pace, on their own terms?regardless of their age. Most people won’t experience the same retirement that their parents did, nor do they necessarily want to. Page by page, top financial planner Mitch Anthony reveals how new opportunities will enable individuals to create tailor-made retirements. He includes new research and studies to back his insights and introduces readers to important concepts such as “wealthcare” and “return on life.” Filled with engaging anecdotes and inspirational suggestions, this book will motivate readers to rethink the way they retire.